Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  4 / 72 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 4 / 72 Next Page
Page Background

2

Last year, we were able to help more

wounded Veterans than ever before.

injured and sick Veteran who needs us,

both now and as they grow older. In many

cases, the consequences of injury or

illness as a result of service are also felt

keenly by the family and friends of an

individual – we make a solemn promise

to be there for them too.

Last year, Help for Heroes turned ten

years old. When the Charity was born in

2007 from the vision and passion of its

founders Bryn and Emma Parry, conflict

in Afghanistan was high on the news

agenda. This may no longer be the case,

yet the need for the services that we

provide is no less vital. Research we have

previously conducted alongside King’s

College London indicates that more than

66,000 men and women will need some

kind of support as a result of their service

between 1991 and 2014.

I

n 2018, Help for Heroes has been able

to help more wounded Veterans than

ever before.

It is a common assumption that because

our Armed Forces are not currently

engaged in a major visible conflict that

the need for support is diminished,

however this is not the case. Whilst it is

true that the physical injuries sustained

during military service are often apparent,

for many the effects of serving on the

front line only come to the surface in

the months and years that follow.

An increasing number of serving

personnel are being medically discharged

due to issues with mental health.

According to the most recent data held

by the Ministry of Defence, the number

discharged because of mental or

behavioural disorders has significantly

increased in the last four years

(1)

.

Many more, whose physical scars may

be apparent at the point of discharge,

suffer in silence with the impact on

their mental health until they can bear

their hidden wounds no more.

Making a promise

Every year we learn of Veterans who

end their lives because of their inability

to cope with the transition into civilian

life. We wish to see an end to this reality,

and to be there for every wounded,

CHAIRMAN’S

FOREWORD

 It is a common

assumption that because

our Armed Forces are

not currently engaged

in a major visible conflict

that the need for support

is diminished.